MBA bloggers share works on topics such as negotiations, strategy, entrepreneurship and decision-making for the Financial Times.

Although MBA education is known for its practical focus, there is also a lot to read during your studies. Make sure that you check out these books.

Thinking Fast and Slow’ by Daniel Kahneman: The book provides insights into how and why we reason the way we do. The main point is that humans have two systems of thinking: System 1, for tasks that require little thought, and System 2, for tasks that require depth of thought. This book is relevant to all MBAs. About 50% of my professors have cited it in lectures. Stephen Morse, Oxford Saïd Business School

A Concise Guide to Macroeconomics’ by David Moss: This was refreshing as it explains the basics of the topic in a crisp and jargon-free way. I liked the way Moss shows how different concepts are linked to each other and makes them relevant in a managerial context. Marta Szczerba, Harvard Business School

Zero to One’ by Peter Thiel: This book led me to think about building a successful new business as a process of uncovering “secrets” about people and how we live. It emphasises the discovery phase of starting a company — finding the right idea and the people who need it. Before attending Chicago Booth, I had not put enough focus on those aspects. Julia McInnis, Chicago Booth

Bargaining for Advantage — Negotiating Strategies for Reasonable People’, by G Richard Shell: An easily digestible handbook that presents negotiation strategy in an interesting and logical way. This book has persuaded me that negotiation is less of a dark art and more a trainable skill. Philippa Rock, Wharton.

Contemporary Strategy Analysis’ by Robert M Grant: It is an excellent introduction to the topic and discusses all the basic concepts one needs to be aware of. Rosen Enchev, European School of Management and Technology

Source: The Financial Times